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Magnolia, Saucer Magnolia x soulangeana

Saucer Magnolia - Magnolia x soulangeana
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Small low-branched tree with large, saucer-shaped flowers. Early-spring blossoms are pinkish-purple outside, white inside. Medium fast-growing, good pollution tolerance. Likes moist, deep, acid soil and full sun. Grows to 20' to 30', 25' spread. (zones 4-9)

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Zones 4 - 9 Zones 4 - 9
Hardiness Zones 4 - 9
The Saucer Magnolia can be expected to grow in the zones shown in color in the arborday.org zone map. View Map
Flowering Tree Flowering Tree
Type of tree
Flowering Trees, Ornamental Trees
20' - 30' High 20' - 30' High
Mature Height
The Saucer Magnolia grows to be 20' - 30' feet in height.
25' Spread 25' Spread
Mature Spread
The Saucer Magnolia has a spread of about 25' at full maturity.
Medium Growth Medium Growth
Growth Rate
This tree grows at a medium growth rate. More about this.
Full Sun Full Sun
Sun
This magnolia does well in full sun.
Various Soils Various Soils
Soil
The Saucer Magnolia grows in acidic, loamy, moist, rich, sandy, well drained, clay soils.
Rounded Shape Rounded Shape
Shape
This magnolia has rounded, upright or erect shape.
Attributes

One of the most popular flowering trees in the United States, this tree is planted widely both in America and Europe. The tree tolerates poor soil and air pollution and is often used as an ornamental. This tree will exhibit blossoms when other trees are finished for the season.

Description

Small low-branched tree with large, saucer-shaped flowers. Early-spring blossoms are pinkish-purple outside, white inside. Medium fast-growing, good pollution tolerance. Likes moist, deep, acid soil and full sun. Avoid frost pockets as late spring frosts and freezes will kill flower buds. Grows to 20' to 30', 25' spread. (zones 4-9)

Wildlife Value

Wildlife use larger dead branches of the Saucer Magnolia as nesting sites and the sprouts of young trees are browsed.

History/Lore/Use

A hybrid cousin of America's magnificent Southern Magnolia, the Saucer Magnolia is actually a large spreading shrub that take its name from its wide, saucer-like flowers. First cultivated in 1826.

Moisture

Moist, has some drought resistance.

Leaves

The leaves are simple, alternate, three to six inches in length, about half as wide. Medium to dark green in summer, they sometimes turn an attractive brown in autumn.

Flower Color

The flowers are pink and white, are very attractive, can reappear throughout the summer and sometimes will carry over into winter although the colors tend to fade with re-emerging blossoms.

Bloom Time

Late February to April.

Fruit Description

The fruit is elongated, 1 to 3 inches long; they appear in August and contain small, pointed red or deep pink seeds. Attractive to birds, they do produce minor amounts of litter.