Trees

Elm, Lacebark Ulmus parvifolia

This graceful tree has a rounded crown adorned with lustrous dark green leaves changing to yellow and reddish purple in fall. Adapts to many soil conditions. Lacebark Elm is a tough and durable tree for any situation. Medium to fast growing. Grows 40' to 50' with 40' spread. (Zones 5-9)

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Zones 5 - 9
Zones 5 - 9

Hardiness Zones: Zones 5 - 9
The Lacebark Elm can be expected to grow in the zones shown in color in the arborday.org zone map. VIEW MAP

Ornamental Tree
Ornamental Tree

Type of tree:
The Lacebark Elm falls into the following type(s): Ornamental Trees, Shade Trees

40' - 50' High
40' - 50' High

Mature Height:
The Lacebark Elm grows to be 40' - 50' feet in height.

35' - 45' Spread
35' - 45' Spread

Mature Spread:
The Lacebark Elm has a spread of about 35' - 45' at full maturity.

Medium to Fast Growth
Medium to Fast Growth

Growth Rate:
This tree grows at a medium to fast growth rate. [More about this.]

Full Sun
Full Sun

Sun:
This elm does well in full sun, partial shade.

Various Soils
Various Soils

Soil:
The Lacebark Elm grows in acidic, alkaline, drought tolerant, loamy, moist, sandy, well drained, wet, wide range, clay soils.

Rounded Shape
Rounded Shape

Shape:
This elm has rounded, vase shape.

More Info
More Info

Attributes:
Considered a handsome and very durable tree, the Lacebark Elm is attractive as a street tree because of its ability to grow in adverse conditions and its relative freedom from the diseases that have ravaged many other Elm species.

Description:
This graceful tree has a rounded crown adorned with lustrous dark green leaves changing to yellow and reddish purple in fall. Adapts to many soil conditions. Lacebark Elm is a tough and durable tree for any situation. Medium to fast growing. Grows 40' to 50' with 40' spread. (Zones 5-9)

Wildlife Value:
The Lacebark Elm provides nesting sites for small animals and birds.

History/Lore/Use:
This landscape standout earned the name Lacebark Elm for its distinctive bark, which is mottled instead of ridged as in other Elms, and often creates colorful patterns in its tree trunk. A native of China, Korea and Japan, the tree was introduced to America in 1794.

Moisture:
This tree has normal moisture requirements, with some flood tolerance and drought resistance.

Leaves:
Leaves are a dark, glossy green and range from 3/4 to 2 inches long and are the smallest of the elms. Young leaves are hairy beneath and glossy above. Foliage is somewhat leathery at maturity. Leaves have serrate, rather than doubly serrate, leaf margins. Leaf bases are uneven. Fall color ranges from yellow to purple and is unusually good when compared to other elms.

Flower Color:
Green, not noteworthy.

Bloom Time:
August-September..

Fruit Description:
The fruit is oval, 1/2 inch long, brown, fairly noticeable.