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Hackberry Celtis occidentalis

Hackberry - Celtis occidentalis
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Tolerant of a wide range of conditions, the Hackberry is a good landscape choice. Grows to a broad crown with arching branches, not unlike the American Elm. Well-suited to urban areas, it withstands wind and city conditions. Grows 40'-70' with a 50' spread. (Zones 3-9)

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Zones 3 - 9 Zones 3 - 9
Hardiness Zones 3 - 9
The Hackberry can be expected to grow in the zones shown in color in the arborday.org zone map. View Map
Ornamental Tree Ornamental Tree
Type of tree
Ornamental Trees, Shade Trees
40' - 60' High 40' - 60' High
Mature Height
The Hackberry grows to be 40' - 60' feet in height.
40' - 60' Spread 40' - 60' Spread
Mature Spread
The Hackberry has a spread of about 40' - 60' at full maturity.
Medium to Fast Growth Medium to Fast Growth
Growth Rate
This tree grows at a medium to fast growth rate. More about this.
Full Sun Full Sun
Sun
This Hackberry does well in full sun.
Various Soils Various Soils
Soil
The Hackberry grows in acidic, alkaline, drought tolerant, loamy, moist, rich, sandy, well drained, wet, wide range, clay soils.
Rounded Shape Rounded Shape
Shape
This Hackberry has rounded, vase shape.
Attributes

The Hackberry has been called admiringly, "one tough tree!" Found on a wide range of soils east of the Rockies from southern Canada to Florida, Hackberries thrive in a wide range of temperatures and on sites that vary from 14 to 60 inches of annual rainfall. Here is a tree that can stand up to strong winds, tolerate air pollution, and bring shade to hot city streets.

Description

Tolerant of a wide range of conditions, the Hackberry is a good landscape choice. Grows to a broad crown with arching branches, not unlike the American Elm. Well-suited to urban areas, it withstands wind and city conditions. Grows 40'-70' with a 50' spread. (Zones 3-9)

Wildlife Value

The fruit of the Hackberry is popular with winter birds, especially the cedar waxwing, mockingbird, and robin.

History/Lore/Use

In earlier years, its tough, flexible wood was used for barrel hoops and many a pioneer cabin was equipped with durable Hackberry wood flooring. The tree was first cultivated in 1636.

Moisture

Has some tolerance for both flooding and drought.

Leaves

Shaped like spearheads, approximately 2 to 4 inches long and 1-1/2 to 2 inches wide, arranged alternately along the twigs. Small teeth edge at least the upper half of the leaf.

Flower Color

Green color, faded, not noteworthy

Bloom Time

April-May

Fruit Description

The Hackberry produces a small, dark-red berries that turn purple as they mature. The berry is less than 1/2 inch in diameter and is borne on slender stems about 1/2 to 3/4 inches long. Inside is a pit, that when scraped clean, reveals an interesting net-like pattern. The fruit is attractive to wildlife.